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The setjmp() macro should only be invoked from one of the contexts listed in §7.13.1.1 of [[ISO/IEC 9899:1999]]. Invoking setjmp() outside of one of these contexts results in undefined behavior (see Undefined Behavior 119).

After invoking longjmp(), non-volatile-qualified local objects should not be accessed if their values could have changed since the invocation of setjmp(). Their value in this case is considered indeterminate and accessing them is undefined behavior (see Undefined Behavior 121, 10).

The longjmp() function should never be used to return control to a function that has terminated execution (see Undefined Behavior 120).

This recommendation is related to SIG32-C. Do not call longjmp() from inside a signal handler and ENV32-C. All atexit handlers must return normally.

Noncompliant Code Example

This noncompliant code example calls setjmp() in an assignment statement, resulting in undefined behavior.

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  int i = setjmp(buf);
  if (i == 0) {
    g();
  } else {
    /* longjmp was invoked */
  }
}

void g(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Compliant Solution

Placing the call to setjmp() in the if statement and (optionally) comparing it with a constant integer removes the undefined behavior, as shown in this compliant solution.

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  if (setjmp(buf) == 0) {
    g();
  } else {
    /* longjmp was invoked */
  }
}

void g(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Noncompliant Code Example

Any attempt to invoke the longjmp() function to transfer control to a function that has completed execution results in undefined behavior.

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  g();
  h();
  return;
}

void g(void) {
  if (setjmp(buf) != 0) {
    /* longjmp was invoked*/
  }
  return;
}

void h(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Compliant Solution

The longjmp() function should only be used when the function containing the corresponding setjmp() is guaranteed not to have terminated execution, as in the following example.

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  if (setjmp(buf) != 0) {
    /* longjmp was invoked */
  } else {
    h();
  }
  return;
}

void h(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Noncompliant Code Example

Non-volatile-qualified objects local to the function that invoked the corresponding setjmp() have indeterminate values after longjmp() has been executed if their value has been changed since the invocation of setjmp().

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  int i = 0;
  if (setjmp(buf) != 0) {
    printf("%i\n", i);
    /* ... */
  }
  i = 2;
  g();
}

void g(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Compliant Solution

If an object local to the function that invoked setjmp() needs to be accessed after longjmp() returns control to the function, the object should be volatile-qualified.

jmp_buf buf;

void f(void) {
  volatile int i = 0;
  if (setjmp(buf) != 0) {
    printf("%i\n", i);
    /* ... */
  }
  i = 2;
  g();
}

void g(void) {
  /* ... */
  longjmp(buf, 1);
}

Risk Assessment

Recommendation

Severity

Likelihood

Remediation Cost

Priority

Level

MSC22-C

low

probably

medium

P4

L3

References

[[ISO/IEC 9899:1999]] Section 7.13, "Nonlocal jumps <setjmp.h>", Section J.2, "Portability issues"

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